Tuesday, January 03, 2006

Watch it if you can - Rok ďábla

Will and I had an O’Henry moment Christmas Day. I’d just given him a present and he was starting to unwrap it when he stopped and dashed from the room. He came back with another package and handed it to me.

"Let’s open these together," he said and we did, laughing because we knew what we’d find. Sure enough, I’d given him the dvd for Rok ďábla, and he had given me the same.

"At least I didn’t have to cut off my hair to buy it," I said as I gave him a thank you kiss and tried to decide who might enjoy the movie as much as we do.

It’s a good one, especially if you are a Jaromir Nohavica fan. Rok ďábla is a mock documentary - a rockumentary, Will calls it - so it doesn’t have a thick plot line to worry over. If I had to sum up the story line I’d say: Nohavica starts the movie alone in rehab as a famous, drunk folk singer and ends it alone, sober and a rock star. In between he meets a Czech band, a Kiwi punk composer and the big sound and texture of rock.

We’ve seen it several times, on rental. Although a live concert would be even better, the subtitles add a lot to the music for me. Because, besides being a folk singer, ex-drinker, sometimes rocker, Nohavica is also a poet. His songs are worth listening to, and understanding.

Note: although the original website for the movie has been removed, you can find a copy of the Rok d'abla website here.
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5 comments:

Matthew Gertner said...

What are you doing with the extra copy? ;-)

Julia said...

Hmm... I should start a contest or something! Actually I gave it to my sister, so it is now in circulation in Switzerland if any CH Nohavica fans want to see it!

Ellen said...

:D it pays to be on the spot!

Karla said...

I've been curious how much of the movie is fictional and how much factual. After all... the spontaneous combustion scene captured on film?!

Julia said...

Though the main characters all play themselves (and their assorted instruments), almost all of the plot was fictional - the spontaneous combustion is probably a reference to Spinal Tap.

There is a story that Karel Plihal really did stage a mock funeral at one point, but he didn't combust, luckily for his fans!